#Waterfowl Instagram Photos & Videos

Waterfowl - 1m posts

    Emperor Goose mom & kids, Alaska

    Emperor Goose mom & kids, Alaska

    17 1 11 minutes ago
    We ate great food while at Mike Cole’s “Quack Shack” last season in California. Check out episode 2 in the link in our bio to see all this state has to offer and Mike’s incredible story. .
.
.
#Hunt41
#DuckHunting 
#GooseHunting 
#Ducks
#Waterfowl

    We ate great food while at Mike Cole’s “Quack Shack” last season in California. Check out episode 2 in the link in our bio to see all this state has to offer and Mike’s incredible story. .
    .
    .
    #Hunt41
    #DuckHunting
    #GooseHunting
    #Ducks
    #Waterfowl

    68 1 21 minutes ago
    Back to the world of connectivity after a wonderful week in Alaska’s wilderness! A male King Eider keeps a watchful eye on our group as we photograph him in Barrow, Alaska.  King Eider are arctic birds, coming to the arctic coasts only to breed and raise young. They spend the rest of the year out to sea where they can form large flocks that can number as many as 100,000 individuals. Nikon D3x camera body and Nikon AF-S 800mm 1:5.6 FL ED VR lens. -•••-
:
:
:
:
:
#kingeider #eider #duck #arctic #alaska #nikon #waterfowl #barrow #bird #birds #birdphoto #intagram #nature

    Back to the world of connectivity after a wonderful week in Alaska’s wilderness! A male King Eider keeps a watchful eye on our group as we photograph him in Barrow, Alaska. King Eider are arctic birds, coming to the arctic coasts only to breed and raise young. They spend the rest of the year out to sea where they can form large flocks that can number as many as 100,000 individuals. Nikon D3x camera body and Nikon AF-S 800mm 1:5.6 FL ED VR lens. -•••-
    :
    :
    :
    :
    :
    #kingeider #eider #duck #arctic #alaska #nikon #waterfowl #barrow #bird #birds #birdphoto #intagram #nature

    380 21 37 minutes ago
    Biologists, landowners and especially waterfowl hunters always eagerly anticipate the annual duck population survey released each August by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Canadian Wildlife Service, hoping that waterfowl counts remain above board.
•
This year’s annual survey, released Monday, estimates the breeding duck population at 38.9 million, about a 6% decrease from last year’s count of 41.19 million. While that may cause some concern as a whole, the overall count still remains 10% above the long-term average. That being said, the 2019 survey is the first one since 2008 showing a dip below 40 million for the entire breeding population.
•
Highlights from the survey include:
Mallards increased 2% to 9.42 million, 19% above the long-term average.
Green-winged teal rose 4% to 3.18 million, 47% above the long-term average.
American wigeon rose just slightly to 2.83 million, 8% above the long-term average.
Gadwall rose 13% to 3.26 million, 61% above the long-term average.
Shovelers declined 13% to 3.65 million, 39% above the long-term average.
Blue-winged teal fell 16% to 5.43 million, 6% above the long-term average.
Pintails fell 4% to 2.27 million, 42% below the long-term average.
•
Also of note, all three diving duck species surveyed showed declines. Redheads fell 27% to 730,000, putting them at the long-term average. Canvasbacks dropped 5% to 650,000, 10% above the long-term average. Scaup fell 10% to 3.59 million, 28% below the long-term average.
•
Visit the Texas Outdoor Digest [LINK IN BIO] for the full report, with commentary from Texas’ waterfowl program leader.

    Biologists, landowners and especially waterfowl hunters always eagerly anticipate the annual duck population survey released each August by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Canadian Wildlife Service, hoping that waterfowl counts remain above board.

    This year’s annual survey, released Monday, estimates the breeding duck population at 38.9 million, about a 6% decrease from last year’s count of 41.19 million. While that may cause some concern as a whole, the overall count still remains 10% above the long-term average. That being said, the 2019 survey is the first one since 2008 showing a dip below 40 million for the entire breeding population.

    Highlights from the survey include:
    Mallards increased 2% to 9.42 million, 19% above the long-term average.
    Green-winged teal rose 4% to 3.18 million, 47% above the long-term average.
    American wigeon rose just slightly to 2.83 million, 8% above the long-term average.
    Gadwall rose 13% to 3.26 million, 61% above the long-term average.
    Shovelers declined 13% to 3.65 million, 39% above the long-term average.
    Blue-winged teal fell 16% to 5.43 million, 6% above the long-term average.
    Pintails fell 4% to 2.27 million, 42% below the long-term average.

    Also of note, all three diving duck species surveyed showed declines. Redheads fell 27% to 730,000, putting them at the long-term average. Canvasbacks dropped 5% to 650,000, 10% above the long-term average. Scaup fell 10% to 3.59 million, 28% below the long-term average.

    Visit the Texas Outdoor Digest [LINK IN BIO] for the full report, with commentary from Texas’ waterfowl program leader.

    32 1 1 hour ago

Top #Waterfowl posts

    Miss this sound?

    Miss this sound?

    2,878 70 19 August, 2019
    After a good start to the morning, you get 2 more bonus birds to fill a limit. Which 2 birds would you choose to fill a perfect limit?

    After a good start to the morning, you get 2 more bonus birds to fill a limit. Which 2 birds would you choose to fill a perfect limit?

    2,438 35 18 August, 2019