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Photo by @handluggageonly || Visiting Munich, I heard about these stairs in an unimposing, and somewhat unexpected, location in the city and went to check it out. My fascination with it is perhaps due to the dichotomy of what it is and what it represents.⁠
•⁠
On the one hand, it’s a beautiful piece of art. Its twists and turns make it just gorgeous to look at. On the other hand, it’s functionally pointless in terms of what it’s technically supposed to do. Its stairs take you right back to where you started, all without having gone anywhere.⁠
•⁠
The dichotomy carries on throughout the architectural design as well. It is asymmetrical yet somehow symmetrical.⁠
•⁠
The short version of all of this though is that I went to Munich and found something beautiful to look at and play with. 😄😄

Photo by @handluggageonly || Visiting Munich, I heard about these stairs in an unimposing, and somewhat unexpected, location in the city and went to check it out. My fascination with it is perhaps due to the dichotomy of what it is and what it represents.⁠
•⁠
On the one hand, it’s a beautiful piece of art. Its twists and turns make it just gorgeous to look at. On the other hand, it’s functionally pointless in terms of what it’s technically supposed to do. Its stairs take you right back to where you started, all without having gone anywhere.⁠
•⁠
The dichotomy carries on throughout the architectural design as well. It is asymmetrical yet somehow symmetrical.⁠
•⁠
The short version of all of this though is that I went to Munich and found something beautiful to look at and play with. 😄😄
38,994 128 17 January, 2020

#Lr_Human Photo by @shortstache || I was catching the sunset here on the beach with great company. My buddy @johnnyhomemovies was shooting some Super 8 Film of the ocean and I caught him in his element.

#Lr_Human Photo by @shortstache || I was catching the sunset here on the beach with great company. My buddy @johnnyhomemovies was shooting some Super 8 Film of the ocean and I caught him in his element.
50,447 101 15 January, 2020

#Lr_Human Photo by @lindsayadler_photo|| I get extremely inspired by collaborating with other artists. With makeup artists, I’ll present a general concept, they create the masterpiece, and I capture their art in a creative way. It really helps to elevate the work and push it to explore both our strengths. I told the makeup artist Roshar that I wanted him to explore the bold and creative shapes he often makes with makeup. This is what he created. I decided to use a hard light and star filter to create those star effects in-camera. I then warmed up the white balance to give the entire shot this golden feel.

#Lr_Human Photo by @lindsayadler_photo|| I get extremely inspired by collaborating with other artists. With makeup artists, I’ll present a general concept, they create the masterpiece, and I capture their art in a creative way. It really helps to elevate the work and push it to explore both our strengths. I told the makeup artist Roshar that I wanted him to explore the bold and creative shapes he often makes with makeup. This is what he created. I decided to use a hard light and star filter to create those star effects in-camera. I then warmed up the white balance to give the entire shot this golden feel.
19,390 44 14 January, 2020

Photo by @matildegattoni|| COMPASSION. In February 2017 Alice Kideu Wani Kaya, 64, decided to flee the South Sudanese war - a brutal internal conflict that had displaced more than 4 million people - for the safety of neighboring Uganda. She escaped together with her 10-year-old child and five other orphans. The trip lasted days, during which the small group had neither food nor shelter. “I was apprehensive and distraught”, she explains. “I kept on asking myself what I was going to do with the other children”. ⁠
•⁠
Alice eventually decided to foster the five orphans all alone. She now lives in the refugee camp of Palorinya, where she is raising them together with her own child. “The first months here were very tough”, she continues. “The suffering bonded us together, unifying us into a real family”.⁠
•⁠
This is my last post of this week’s takeover. It was a pleasure to go through my memories and to share with you some of the most touching stories I covered throughout these years. Thank you for following along! ⁠
•⁠
The theme for this month in Lightroom is #Lr_Human. Submit your work for the chance to be featured!

Photo by @matildegattoni|| COMPASSION. In February 2017 Alice Kideu Wani Kaya, 64, decided to flee the South Sudanese war - a brutal internal conflict that had displaced more than 4 million people - for the safety of neighboring Uganda. She escaped together with her 10-year-old child and five other orphans. The trip lasted days, during which the small group had neither food nor shelter. “I was apprehensive and distraught”, she explains. “I kept on asking myself what I was going to do with the other children”. ⁠
•⁠
Alice eventually decided to foster the five orphans all alone. She now lives in the refugee camp of Palorinya, where she is raising them together with her own child. “The first months here were very tough”, she continues. “The suffering bonded us together, unifying us into a real family”.⁠
•⁠
This is my last post of this week’s takeover. It was a pleasure to go through my memories and to share with you some of the most touching stories I covered throughout these years. Thank you for following along! ⁠
•⁠
The theme for this month in Lightroom is #Lr_Human. Submit your work for the chance to be featured!
37,615 137 13 January, 2020

Photo by @matildegattoni || HOPE. When I visited Dadaab in the summer of 2011, it was the world’s largest refugee camp. At that time 465,000 people were living in this unforgiving land in the middle of the Kenyan desert. More than 1,000 people were arriving daily from neighboring Somalia, pushed by war and a massive drought. Many were in dire need of assistance.⁠
•⁠
During my 10-day stay, I visited Tewfiq secondary school. Most of its pupils had been born in the refugee camp and had never ventured out. They saw that school as their only ticket to the outside world and to a better life. I was touched to see how strong and positive they managed to stay, despite the suffering and hardships they had gone through.⁠
•⁠
One of the students I met there is now doing a masters in Canada. I couldn’t be prouder of him.

Photo by @matildegattoni || HOPE. When I visited Dadaab in the summer of 2011, it was the world’s largest refugee camp. At that time 465,000 people were living in this unforgiving land in the middle of the Kenyan desert. More than 1,000 people were arriving daily from neighboring Somalia, pushed by war and a massive drought. Many were in dire need of assistance.⁠
•⁠
During my 10-day stay, I visited Tewfiq secondary school. Most of its pupils had been born in the refugee camp and had never ventured out. They saw that school as their only ticket to the outside world and to a better life. I was touched to see how strong and positive they managed to stay, despite the suffering and hardships they had gone through.⁠
•⁠
One of the students I met there is now doing a masters in Canada. I couldn’t be prouder of him.
22,382 51 10 January, 2020

Photo by @matildegattoni || PASSION. A background actor and stuntman, Mohamed Habib, 32, started his cinema career when he was 6. "I adore the atmosphere on sets, even when I wake up at 4 am to prepare for a scene. I feel I am doing something important", he explains, while dressing up in his house in Ouarzazate, an enchanting Moroccan oasis and one of cinema's unknown capitals.⁠
•⁠
Within its narrow alleys live a myriad of background actors who are featured in hundreds of world-acclaimed movies and TV series, such as Gladiator and Game of Thrones. Although they regularly play alongside top celebrities, no one knows their names. Most of them live a life of hardship, working 16 hours per day for a paltry 30 dollars.⁠
•⁠
Yet the passion they show for their profession is the most touching and sincere testimony to the greatness of cinema. Each night, as they leave the lavish sets to go back to their crumbling houses with their hearts full of pride, they dream of becoming the next international star.

Photo by @matildegattoni || PASSION. A background actor and stuntman, Mohamed Habib, 32, started his cinema career when he was 6. "I adore the atmosphere on sets, even when I wake up at 4 am to prepare for a scene. I feel I am doing something important", he explains, while dressing up in his house in Ouarzazate, an enchanting Moroccan oasis and one of cinema's unknown capitals.⁠
•⁠
Within its narrow alleys live a myriad of background actors who are featured in hundreds of world-acclaimed movies and TV series, such as Gladiator and Game of Thrones. Although they regularly play alongside top celebrities, no one knows their names. Most of them live a life of hardship, working 16 hours per day for a paltry 30 dollars.⁠
•⁠
Yet the passion they show for their profession is the most touching and sincere testimony to the greatness of cinema. Each night, as they leave the lavish sets to go back to their crumbling houses with their hearts full of pride, they dream of becoming the next international star.
24,006 43 8 January, 2020

Photo by @matildegattoni || FRAILTY. Togbe Koffi, 63, is the chief of Agbavi, a Togolese village on the Atlantic coastline. When he was a kid, his house was in an area that has nowadays been swallowed by the ocean. "At that time erosion was a seasonal event. Nowadays the water advances all year long", he explains. "My third house is about to crumble into the ocean. I would like to cry, but a chief cannot cry".⁠
•⁠
As a direct consequence of global warming and sea-level rise, more than 7,000 km of the African coastline, from Mauritania to Cameroon, are eroding at a pace of up to 36 meters per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction.⁠
•⁠
The problems haunting West Africa now are the harbinger of what mankind will experience if we won't be able to find a viable balance between progress, social inequality and environmental conservation. This conundrum has become the most pressing issue of our times.

Photo by @matildegattoni || FRAILTY. Togbe Koffi, 63, is the chief of Agbavi, a Togolese village on the Atlantic coastline. When he was a kid, his house was in an area that has nowadays been swallowed by the ocean. "At that time erosion was a seasonal event. Nowadays the water advances all year long", he explains. "My third house is about to crumble into the ocean. I would like to cry, but a chief cannot cry".⁠
•⁠
As a direct consequence of global warming and sea-level rise, more than 7,000 km of the African coastline, from Mauritania to Cameroon, are eroding at a pace of up to 36 meters per year, disrupting the lives of tens of millions of people in thirteen countries. While local governments scramble to salvage big cities and industrial complexes, thousands of villages are being left out in the cold, pushing a thousands-year-old way of life on the brink of extinction.⁠
•⁠
The problems haunting West Africa now are the harbinger of what mankind will experience if we won't be able to find a viable balance between progress, social inequality and environmental conservation. This conundrum has become the most pressing issue of our times.
29,137 53 7 January, 2020

Photo by @matildegattoni || Hey everyone, this is photojournalist Matilde Gattoni. While travelling worldwide to cover wars, natural disasters, mass migrations and climate change, I often find myself reflecting on what is the fundamental nature of human existence. How come we manage to find a deep connection with someone who doesn’t even share our language? What unites us beyond diverse cultural upbringings and geographical distances?⁠
•⁠
Through this week’s takeover, I will unveil some of the most touching human experiences I have come across during my 18 year-long-career.⁠
•⁠
RESILIENCE. At 7:59 am on December 26, 2004, a massive tsunami devastated the Indian Ocean shores, killing an estimated 280,000 people and displacing more than 1.6 million in 15 countries. The Indonesian province of Aceh was the hardest hit by one of the most powerful natural disasters ever recorded in history. ⁠
•⁠
A few months later, I travelled to Banda Aceh for the first time. One day, while I was on the beach, I noticed two friends slowly walking towards the sea, holding each other’s hands. As they reached the shore, they stopped and looked at each other. They were visibly tense and hesitant to get into the water. Suddenly, one of them took courage and ran into the ocean. As the first wave broke, she let herself go and started laughing.

Photo by @matildegattoni || Hey everyone, this is photojournalist Matilde Gattoni. While travelling worldwide to cover wars, natural disasters, mass migrations and climate change, I often find myself reflecting on what is the fundamental nature of human existence. How come we manage to find a deep connection with someone who doesn’t even share our language? What unites us beyond diverse cultural upbringings and geographical distances?⁠
•⁠
Through this week’s takeover, I will unveil some of the most touching human experiences I have come across during my 18 year-long-career.⁠
•⁠
RESILIENCE. At 7:59 am on December 26, 2004, a massive tsunami devastated the Indian Ocean shores, killing an estimated 280,000 people and displacing more than 1.6 million in 15 countries. The Indonesian province of Aceh was the hardest hit by one of the most powerful natural disasters ever recorded in history. ⁠
•⁠
A few months later, I travelled to Banda Aceh for the first time. One day, while I was on the beach, I noticed two friends slowly walking towards the sea, holding each other’s hands. As they reached the shore, they stopped and looked at each other. They were visibly tense and hesitant to get into the water. Suddenly, one of them took courage and ran into the ocean. As the first wave broke, she let herself go and started laughing.
33,905 102 6 January, 2020

Hey everyone, @benjamin_warde here, welcome back to #LightroomLessons. Swipe through today’s mini-tutorial to learn how to use Lightroom to bring out shadow details in your photos, without losing contrast.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 1:⁠⠀
Here’s what the photo looked like before I brought out the shadow detail. Let’s make this look better! First, make sure you’re in Edit mode.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 2:⁠⠀
Oftentimes photos don’t need an overall increase in exposure, they just need to the dark areas brightened to bring out more detail. This photo is a good example - I already like the exposure on the sky, so I’m not going to increase overall exposure, I’m just going to brighten the shadows. Tap on the “Light” button.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 3:⁠⠀
Scroll down until you see the “Shadows” slider and then drag it up to the right to increase brightness in just the shadow areas. For this photo, I took it up to 75, but the exact setting you use will depend on your particular photo - adjust it until it looks good to you. Now we can see so much more detail in the shadow areas! I like it, but the problem with bringing up the Shadows so much is that the photo now looks kind of flat and low contrast overall. I like being able to see all that shadow detail, but I still want my photo to have nice contrast, so scroll down until you see the “Blacks” slider…⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 4:⁠⠀
…and then drag the “Blacks” slider down to the left, which will darken just the very darkest parts of the photo, and return overall contrast to the photo while still keeping all those shadow details that we brought in when we brightened the shadows.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Bonus Tip:⁠⠀
And that’s it! My super simple recipe for bringing out shadow detail while maintaining contrast: brighten the Shadows and darken the Blacks. But here’s a bonus tip. Do you like to see a histogram while adjusting the exposure to your photos? If you’re in Lightroom on a computer you can show the histogram via a menu item, but if you’re in Lightroom on mobile you can show the histogram just by tapping on the image with two fingers, twice (the first two-finger tap will show photo info, the second will show the histogram - two-finger tap a third time to turn off the histogram).

Hey everyone, @benjamin_warde here, welcome back to #LightroomLessons. Swipe through today’s mini-tutorial to learn how to use Lightroom to bring out shadow details in your photos, without losing contrast.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 1:⁠⠀
Here’s what the photo looked like before I brought out the shadow detail. Let’s make this look better! First, make sure you’re in Edit mode.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 2:⁠⠀
Oftentimes photos don’t need an overall increase in exposure, they just need to the dark areas brightened to bring out more detail. This photo is a good example - I already like the exposure on the sky, so I’m not going to increase overall exposure, I’m just going to brighten the shadows. Tap on the “Light” button.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 3:⁠⠀
Scroll down until you see the “Shadows” slider and then drag it up to the right to increase brightness in just the shadow areas. For this photo, I took it up to 75, but the exact setting you use will depend on your particular photo - adjust it until it looks good to you. Now we can see so much more detail in the shadow areas! I like it, but the problem with bringing up the Shadows so much is that the photo now looks kind of flat and low contrast overall. I like being able to see all that shadow detail, but I still want my photo to have nice contrast, so scroll down until you see the “Blacks” slider…⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Step 4:⁠⠀
…and then drag the “Blacks” slider down to the left, which will darken just the very darkest parts of the photo, and return overall contrast to the photo while still keeping all those shadow details that we brought in when we brightened the shadows.⁠⠀
•⁠⠀
Bonus Tip:⁠⠀
And that’s it! My super simple recipe for bringing out shadow detail while maintaining contrast: brighten the Shadows and darken the Blacks. But here’s a bonus tip. Do you like to see a histogram while adjusting the exposure to your photos? If you’re in Lightroom on a computer you can show the histogram via a menu item, but if you’re in Lightroom on mobile you can show the histogram just by tapping on the image with two fingers, twice (the first two-finger tap will show photo info, the second will show the histogram - two-finger tap a third time to turn off the histogram).
37,362 97 3 January, 2020

#Lr_Vista Photo by @martenkaehlert || I was on a two-day boat trip with 10 other photographers, filmmakers and explorers in Mecklenburgische Seenplatte in northeastern Germany. Two days full of fun, meeting wonderful people and exploring some beautiful spots in this area by boat. I took this shot while exploring the town, Malchow, from the deck of our boat. I was so happy with the autumn mood on this day—clouds, a bit of rain and lots of wind. 😊 ⁠
•⁠
I needed some time to get some of the birds in frame. They really made the shot perfect for me.⁠
•⁠
Have you ever tried to take a shot with a really long lens handheld on a shaky boat?

#Lr_Vista Photo by @martenkaehlert || I was on a two-day boat trip with 10 other photographers, filmmakers and explorers in Mecklenburgische Seenplatte in northeastern Germany. Two days full of fun, meeting wonderful people and exploring some beautiful spots in this area by boat. I took this shot while exploring the town, Malchow, from the deck of our boat. I was so happy with the autumn mood on this day—clouds, a bit of rain and lots of wind. 😊 ⁠
•⁠
I needed some time to get some of the birds in frame. They really made the shot perfect for me.⁠
•⁠
Have you ever tried to take a shot with a really long lens handheld on a shaky boat?
37,604 88 2 January, 2020

#Lr_Vista Photo by @findmeonthemountain || I’m always looking for unique compositions in this much-photographed place. This is a spot I’ve shot from in all seasons, and I visited it again this fall. It’s one of my favorites. I love the layers, the rolling hills in front of those majestic mountains, the light and shadow at golden-hour, and the little pops of yellow from the pockets of foliage. It’s fun to bring out the long lenses here to compress the scene. For this image, I used my 70-200mm lens from @tamronusa.

#Lr_Vista Photo by @findmeonthemountain || I’m always looking for unique compositions in this much-photographed place. This is a spot I’ve shot from in all seasons, and I visited it again this fall. It’s one of my favorites. I love the layers, the rolling hills in front of those majestic mountains, the light and shadow at golden-hour, and the little pops of yellow from the pockets of foliage. It’s fun to bring out the long lenses here to compress the scene. For this image, I used my 70-200mm lens from @tamronusa.
26,871 59 31 December, 2019

#Lr_Vista Photo by @k0s.1122 || I was touring in Bangkok, Thailand a few months ago, which was the 20th country I have visited to shoot. After a one-hour drive, I found this beautiful location. So I waited for just the right moment until the rays of light shined through, giving this location an otherworldly atmosphere. After a one hour wait, I captured this shot.

#Lr_Vista Photo by @k0s.1122 || I was touring in Bangkok, Thailand a few months ago, which was the 20th country I have visited to shoot. After a one-hour drive, I found this beautiful location. So I waited for just the right moment until the rays of light shined through, giving this location an otherworldly atmosphere. After a one hour wait, I captured this shot.
27,978 54 30 December, 2019